Paper Title

'Työmies?': Finnish Canadians in the Economy: A Historiographic Overview

Location

Fisher 127

Event Website

http://www.finnforumx.com/

Start Date

12-4-2014 10:00 AM

End Date

12-4-2014 10:30 AM

Description

Finnish immigrants are often seen as labor activists, even “radicals,” and key players in the “left-right” political divide, thus indicating a real presence on the “other” side of the economy. How did successive historians build these now-standard views? This paper takes a sweeping tour of writing on Finnish Canadian workers, tracing the evolution of these assessments. Archives and histories provided basic notions of “the” Finnish Canadian and were key sources as professional scholars – many Finns themselves – began their work. In Canada, new academics – Varpu Lindstrom most prominently – wrote about women, arts and culture, intellectual activity, and the impact of Finns as “exceptional” historical actors in socioeconomic terms. But, have historians of Finnish Canadian workers built a convincing case? Examination of Finnish Canadian “economic” historiography offers insights into the Finnish Canadian “story,” and the nature of generalization in immigrant and ethnic history.

Presenter Bio

An Assistant Professor of History, Krats has taught at Western University, London, Canada, for two decades. His ongoing research project is a broad historical comparison of the Sudbury region of Northeastern Ontario and the Keweenaw Peninsula of Upper Michigan. Ideas of “north” and Finnish-Canadian history and culture are additional long-term interests.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 12th, 10:00 AM Apr 12th, 10:30 AM

'Työmies?': Finnish Canadians in the Economy: A Historiographic Overview

Fisher 127

Finnish immigrants are often seen as labor activists, even “radicals,” and key players in the “left-right” political divide, thus indicating a real presence on the “other” side of the economy. How did successive historians build these now-standard views? This paper takes a sweeping tour of writing on Finnish Canadian workers, tracing the evolution of these assessments. Archives and histories provided basic notions of “the” Finnish Canadian and were key sources as professional scholars – many Finns themselves – began their work. In Canada, new academics – Varpu Lindstrom most prominently – wrote about women, arts and culture, intellectual activity, and the impact of Finns as “exceptional” historical actors in socioeconomic terms. But, have historians of Finnish Canadian workers built a convincing case? Examination of Finnish Canadian “economic” historiography offers insights into the Finnish Canadian “story,” and the nature of generalization in immigrant and ethnic history.

http://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/copperstrikesymposium/Schedule/Saturday/51